When I heard that Paddy Considine was working on his directorial debut, I immediately hoped it’d be in the tradition of those other fine British actor-turned-writer/directors, Gary Oldman and Tim Roth. Both took one brief spin in the director’s chair, with Nil by Mouth and The War Zone respectively, and managed to turn outRead More →

At the conclusion of Gantz (2010), college student Kei Kurono (Kazunari Ninomiya) found himself at a crossroads. After being swept up in some kind of strange contest with other people recruited apparently at the point of death, Kurono fought in the service of a large black ball called Gantz, battlingRead More →

Cinema Asia is a five part documentary series about Asian film produced for the Discovery channel. Each episode looks into a movie industry of a different country discussing movies made and historical and cultural issues that affect their movie industries. Often a film professor or film critic is used to giveRead More →

Richard Ayoade is a British comic actor best known for his work in TV series such as Garth Marenghi’s Darkplace and, most prominently, as supernerd “Moss” in The IT Crowd. However, he has also a strong sideline in directing music videos for the likes of Kasabian, Arctic Monkeys and The Yeah Yeah Yeahs,Read More →

Arguably the 1970s was the finest period of American horror cinema. An era where everything fell into place – production, performance and thematically. The films of this period really reflected society’s paranoia and ditched the campness of the 60s and took a darker more unnerving approach, pioneering classics in everyRead More →

The teen/high school/coming-of-age film has to be one of the most universal genres. It doesn’t matter if its Jim Stark (Rebel Without A Cause) or Napoleon Dynamite, films of this type elicit nostalgia, make you reminiscence and most people identify with the misfits, loners, the burgeoning sex drive or theRead More →

I must admit that I can’t get enough of this current Japanese trend of ultra low-budget exploitationers, so when I found out Takao Nakano had put his hands to one I was more than eager to check it out. Nakano is perhaps most renowned amongst purveyours of perversion and sleazeRead More →

Originally published in 1938, Graham Greene’s novel Brighton Rock was a seminal and highly influential crime thriller, having been adapted into a play (1944), a film (1947), a radio drama (1997) and even a (short lived) 2004 musical produced for the London stage. Taking its name from the hard confectioneryRead More →

Initially produced in response to a need for new product to broadcast in the wake of the 1988 Writers Guild of America strike, when John Langley’s Cops debuted on American televisions in March of 1989, its camcorder aesthetics and cinema verite feel established a distinct style and signaled the arrivalRead More →

When high-powered businesswoman Hae-won is forced to take leave from her job due to being unwillingly involved in an attempted murder case, she decides on the isolated Moo Do island where she once spent a childhood holiday as her vacation spot. Once she arrives she is reunited with her oldRead More →

You’ve heard of Dirty Harry, Bad Lieutenant, Lieutenant Marion ‘Cobra‘ Cobretti, and for some TV cops: McNulty and Detective Vic Mackay, now let me introduce you to the ultra-violent Assy McGee. Assy’s a gun-toting short tempered alcoholic who doesn’t give a damn about authority, criminals, the criminal process, justice or civilians. Oh yeah and he’sRead More →

Restrepo takes its name from a fallen soldier (who was killed in the Korengal Valley) and focuses on Second Platoon, B Company, 2nd Battalion, 503rd Infantry Regiment (airborne) who were deployed to the notorious Korengal Valley in 2007 for a fifteen month tour. The men are not interested in or botheredRead More →